Primary tabs

The Five Best Film Clips Of This Week

A dog, an elephant, an old TV vampire and some skydivers all feature in our picks of this week's best film clips.

Sharon Van Etten – 'Every Time The Sun Comes Up'

A beautiful clip to go with one of the best pop songs Sharon Van Etten has written. It follows an old man who plays a vampire on a TV show. There's no real narrative, but the four minutes we get to spend with this character are illuminating. Look out for Van Etten herself, who appears in cartoon form midway through. 

Damon Albarn – 'Mr Tembo'

Have you ever wondered who Damon Albarn is talking about in the song 'Mr Tembo'? It's an elephant, which is pretty damn cool. What's even cooler is that the elephant has a pretty big role in the film clip for the song. A must see for all fans of elephants – and who isn't?

Bonnie 'Prince' Billy – 'Bad Man'

Will Oldham – aka Bonnie 'Prince' Billy – isn't renowned for embracing normality. It makes sense, then, that the film clip for his latest track 'Bad Man' is bizarre. A dog walks the streets, wearing a mask. Oldham performs the song in a box overlaying the shot of a woman walking the dog. Occasionally, Oldham himself pats a dog. That's pretty much all there is to say. It doesn't appear as if the clip has any correlation with Oldham's lyric, which makes the whole thing even stranger. 

Mogwai – 'Simon Ferocious'

'Simon Ferocious' is as stirring a song as we've come to expect from the Scottish gods of post-rock. Its clip does a wonderful job of capturing the expansiveness of the band's sound by capturing a group of people skydiving. There's no readily accessible place as expansive as the space between an aeroplane and the ground. A great way to highlight a great track from this year's Rave Tapes LP.

Courtney Barnett & Billy Bragg – 'Sunday Morning' [Live on RocKwiz]

The brilliant pairing of Courtney Barnett and Billy Bragg was never going to be bad. So it's no surprise their rendition of the Velvet Underground's 'Sunday Morning' is masterful. The best thing about this performance is that neither artist is trying to be the centre of attention; both focus solely on the song. Barnett's almost-childish giddy joy is also pretty great, though.

Open